Hans Broek - The Things I Used To Do

The De Pont museum will present new work by Hans Broek (Veenendaal, 1965) from November 14, 2020. The new group of paintings will be shown for the first time under the title The Things I Used To Do and can be seen in Tilburg until April 18, 2021.

Hans Broek, whose American landscape paintings have been in De Pont's collection from the start, started a remarkable new chapter in his work a few years ago. He immersed himself in the Dutch slavery past, a bitter history that was incomprehensibly underexposed for a long time. He visited slave forts on the Atlantic Ocean, worked in Ghana and Senegal, conducted research in Suriname and eagerly read the publications of historians and sociologists who reasoned from a non-white perspective. This eventually led to an extensive series of paintings on this charged subject. They are confrontational works, in which dungeons, cell doors and plantation houses function as silent witnesses to what happened under Dutch rule.

Twenty-five years ago, when B…

Hans Broek, whose American landscape paintings have been in De Pont's collection from the start, started a remarkable new chapter in his work a few years ago. He immersed himself in the Dutch slavery past, a bitter history that was incomprehensibly underexposed for a long time. He visited slave forts on the Atlantic Ocean, worked in Ghana and Senegal, conducted research in Suriname and eagerly read the publications of historians and sociologists who reasoned from a non-white perspective. This eventually led to an extensive series of paintings on this charged subject. They are confrontational works, in which dungeons, cell doors and plantation houses function as silent witnesses to what happened under Dutch rule.

Twenty-five years ago, when Broek traded the Netherlands for America, he made panoramic paintings of cities on the American West Coast: rolling hills with tightly plastered villas that sparkle under a carefree blue sky. With these surprising interpretations of what he saw around him, he breathed new life into the landscape genre in the mid-1990s. The canvases look cinematic and also a bit surreal, because despite the fact that no human is visible, you can feel how the culture controls the environment.

For more information go to depont.nl/te-zien

When

  • daily until April 18th, 2021

Location